My new book: Einstein’s Pathway to the Special Theory of Relativity (2nd Edition)

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My new book Einstein’s Pathway to the Special Theory of Relativity (2nd Edition) is coming out in August 2017.

My new book is a comprehensive monograph on Albert Einstein’s Odyssey to Special and General Relativity.

It is the second edition of my first book, Einstein’s Pathway to the Special Theory of Relativity:

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The book brings together the most recent studies regarding the discovery of Special Relativity between 1895 and 1905 and pertaining to the genesis of General Relativity between 1905 and 1918.

The book encompasses an in-depth historiographical analysis of Einstein’s theory of relativity and Einstein’s own derivations and philosophical perspectives of Einstein’s work.

The first chapter provides a narrative of Einstein’s early life until 1914 without resorting to hagiography.

The second chapter discusses Fin de siècle physics.

The third chapter deals with Einstein’s path to the Special Theory of Relativity and Henri Poincaré’s Dynamics of the Electron.

The fourth chapter focuses on the genesis of the General Theory of Relativity from 1905 until approximately 1922.

The fifth chapter centralizes on Einstein’s methodology and creativity, and on Poincaré’s philosophy.

The final chapter analyzes the sources.

The book is 660 pages long, a comprehensive study of Einstein’s discovery of special and general relativity and of Einstein’s cosmology.

I drew the cover of the book.

Einstein loved sailing and he owned a sailboat, which he called Tümmler (porpoise).

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The cover of my new book Einstein’s Pathway to the Special Theory of Relativity (2nd Edition) shows Einstein, the young patent clerk wearing the patent office suit, the young man and the sea.

 

 

 

Some of the topics discussed in my first book, Einstein’s Pathway to the Special Theory of Relativity

People ask questions about Einstein’s special theory of relativity: How did Einstein come up with the theory of special relativity? What did he invent? What is the theory of special relativity? How did Einstein discover special relativity? Was Einstein the first to arrive at special relativity? Was Einstein the first to invent E = mc2?

Did Poincaré publish special relativity before Einstein? Was Einstein’s special theory of relativity revolutionary for scientists of his day? How did the scientific community receive Einstein’s theory of special relativity when he published it? What were the initial reaction in the scientific community after Einstein had published his paper on special relativity?

In my book, Einstein’s Pathway to the Special Theory of Relativity, I try to answer these and many other questions.The topics discussed in my book are the following:

I start with Einstein’s childhood and school days.

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I then discuss Einstein’s student days at the Zurich Polytechnic. Einstein the rebellious cannot take authority, the patent office, Annus Mirabilis, University of Bern and University of Zurich, Minkowski’s space-time formalism of special relativity.

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Young Einstein, Aarau Class 1896

Additional topics treeated in my book are the following: Fizeau’s water tube experiment, Fresnel’s formula (Fresnel’s dragging coefficient), stellar aberration, and the Michelson and Michelson-Morley Experiments.

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Albert Einstein at the Patent office

Mileva Marić and Einstein

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Eduard Tete, Mileva Marić and Hans Albert

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Einstein’s road to the special theory of relativity: Einstein first believes in the ether, he imagines the chasing a light beam thought experiment and the magnet and conductor thought experiment. Did Einstein respond to the Michelson and Morley experiment? Emission theory, Fizeau’s water tube experiment and ether drift experiments and Einstein’s path to special relativity; “The Step”.

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Henri Poincaré’s possible influence on Einstein’s road to the special theory of relativity.

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Einstein’s methodology and creativity, special principle of relativity and principle of constancy of the velocity of light, no signal moves beyond the speed of light, rigid body and special relativity, the meaning of distant simultaneity, clock synchronization, Lorentz contraction, challenges to Einstein’s connection of synchronisation and Lorentz contraction, Lorentz transformation with no light postulate, superluminal velocities, Laue’s derivation of Fresnel’s formula, the clock paradox and twin paradox, light quanta, mass-energy equivalence, variation of mass with velocity, Kaufmann’s experiments, the principles of relativity as heuristic principles, and Miller ether drift experiments.

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The book also briefly discusses general relativity: Einstein’s 1920 “Geometry and Experience” talk (Einstein’s notion of practical geometry), equivalence principle, equivalence of gravitational and inertial mass, Galileo’s free fall, generalized principle of relativity, gravitational time dilation, the Zurich Notebook, theory of static gravitational fields, the metric tensor, the Einstein-Besso manuscript, Einstein-Grossmann Entwurf theory and Entwurf field equations, the hole argument, the inertio-gravitational field, Einstein’s general relativity: November 1915 field equations, general covariance and generally covariant field equations, the advance of Mercury’s perihelion, Schwarzschild’s solution and singularity, Mach’s principle, Einstein’s 1920 suggestion: Mach’s ether, Einstein’s static universe, the cosmological constant, de Sitter’s universe, and other topics in general relativity and cosmology which lead directly to my second book, General Relativity Conflict and Rivalries.

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My books

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Centenary of the Death of Poincaré – Einstein and Poincaré 2012 פואנקרה ואיינשטיין

לרגל מאה שנה למותו של פואנקרה, פרסמתי בשלושה חלקים מחקר על הנרי פואנקרה, תרומתו בתחום של תורת האלקטרון והאלקטרודינמיקה של הגופים בתנועה והשאלה האם פואנקרה הגיע לתורת יחסות ולגילויים שאותם אנו מוצאים בתורת היחסות הפרטית לפני או במקביל לאיינשטיין. כמובן שהשאלה היא מעט יותר מורכבת ולא פשטנית כפי שהצגתי אותה כאן. בנושא זה כתבתי את עבודת הדוקטורט שלי והמאמרים הם סיכום ועדכון של הדוקטורט שלי שנכתב לפני 14 שנה.

A Biography of Poincaré  – Researcher in dynamics of the electron and electrodynamics –  2012 Centenary of the Death of Poincaré. Here

On January 4, 2012 (the centenary of Henri Poincaré’s death) a colloquium was held in Nancy, France the subject of which was “Vers une biographie d’Henri Poincaré”. Scholars discussed several approaches for writing a biography of Poincaré

 

I present a personal and scientific biographical sketch of Poincaré and his contributions to electrodynamics of moving bodies, which does not in any way reflect Poincaré’s rich personality and immense activity in science. When Poincaré traveled to parts of Europe, Africa and America, his companions noticed that he knew well everything from statistics to history and curious customs and habits of peoples. He was almost teaching everything in science. He was so encyclopedic that he dealt with the outstanding questions in the different branches of physics and mathematics; he had altered whole fields of science such as non-Euclidean geometry, Arithmetic, celestial mechanics, thermodynamics and kinetic theory, optics, electrodynamics, Maxwell’s theory, and other topics from the forefront of Fin de Siècle physical science

As opposed to the prosperity of biographies and secondary papers studying the life and scientific contributions of Albert Einstein, one finds much less biographies and secondary sources discussing Poincaré’s life and work. Unlike Einstein, Poincaré was not a cultural icon. Beginning in 1920 Einstein became a myth and a world famous figure. Although Poincaré was so brilliant in mathematics, he mainly remained a famous mathematician within the professional circle of scientists. He published more papers than Einstein, performed research in many more branches of physics and mathematics, received more prizes on his studies, and was a member of more academies in the whole world. Despite this tremendous yield, Poincaré did not win the Nobel Prize

Most famous is Poincaré’s philosophy of conventionalism, which sprang out of his research into geometry during a period (the end of the 1880’s) when non-Euclidean geometries were a matter of a consistent possibility. Poincaré developed two kinds of conventionalism, conventionalism applicable to geometry and conventionalism for the principles of physics. Both sprang from Poincaré’s mathematical group theory

In addition to the geometries of Euclid, Lobachewski, and Riemann, Poincaré proposed another geometry, the truth of which was not incompatible with the other geometries; he called it the “fourth geometry”. The first time that Poincaré’s fourth geometry appeared in print was in 1891

Einstein did not feel at ease with Poincaré’s standpoint. In 1992 Michel Paty commented on Einstein’s presentation of Poincaré’s conventionalism in 1921, “Actually this is not exactly Poincaré’s point of view, but a translation of it made by Einstein in his own perspective, that is according to his conception of physical Geometry”. See

Scott Walter’s papers here

And Peter Galison’s book Einstein’s Clocks, Poincare’s Maps here

Review by John Stachel: here and by Alberto Martínez here

Scientific contributions in electrodynamics: Before 1905, Poincaré stressed the importance of the method of clocks and their synchronization, but unlike Einstein, magnet and conductor (asymmetries in Lorentz’s theory regarding the explanation of Faraday’s induction) or chasing a light beam and overtaking it, were not a matter of great concern for him

In 1905 Poincaré elaborated Lorentz’s electron theory from 1904 in two papers entitled “On the Dynamics of the Electron”. Poincaré’s theory was a space-time mathematical theory of groups at the basis of which stood the postulate of relativity; Einstein’s 1905 theory was a kinematical theory of relativity

Poincaré did not renounce the ether. He wrote a new law of addition of velocities, but he did not abandon the tacit assumptions made about the nature of time, simultaneity, and space measurements implicit in Newtonian kinematics

Although he questioned absolute time and absolute simultaneity, he did not make new kinematical tacit assumptions about space and time. He also did not require reciprocity of the appearances, and therefore did not discover relativity of simultaneity

These are the main hallmarks of Einstein’s special theory of relativity. Nevertheless, Poincaré had arrived at many novel findings that went way beyond Fin de Siècle physics. here

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Read other point of views: Olivier Darrigol’s papers here and here

Darrigol, Olivier, “Henri Poincaré’s criticism of fin de siècle electrodynamics”, Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 26, 1995, pp. 1-44. here

Darrigol, Olivier, Electrodynamics from Ampère to Einstein, 2000, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Here

Mass-energy equivalence: In 1900 Poincaré considered a device creating and emitting electromagnetic waves. The device emits energy in all directions. As a result of the energy being emitted, it recoils. No motion of any other material body compensates for the recoil at that moment. Poincaré found that as a result of the recoil of the oscillator, in the moving system, the oscillator generating the electromagnetic energy suffers an “apparent complementary force”. In addition, in order to demonstrate the non-violation of the theorem of the motion of the centre of gravity, Poincaré needed an arbitrary convention, the “fictitious fluid”

Einstein demonstrated that if the inertial mass E/c2 is associated with the energy E, and on assuming the inseparability of the theorem of the conservation of mass and that of energy, then – at least as a first approximation – the theorem of the conservation of the motion of the centre of gravity is also valid for all systems in which electromagnetic processes take place

Before 1905 (and also afterwards) Poincaré did not explore the inertial mass-energy equivalence

Einstein was the first to explore the inertial mass-energy equivalence. In 1905 Einstein showed that a change in energy is associated with a change in inertial mass equal to the change in energy divided by c2

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For a different point of view: Darrigol, Olivier, “Poincaré, Einstein, et l’inertie de l’énergie”, Comptes rendus de l’Académie des sciences IV 1, 2000, pp. 143-153. Here

See also this paper by Stephen Boughn and  Tony Rothman. A report of the paper here

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Did Poincaré influence Einstein on his way to the Special theory of relativity? One differentiates two kinds of questions here

  1What was the effect of Poincaré’s studies on the development of the Special Theory of relativity? and

 2What was the effect Poincaré’s research may have had on the development of Einstein’s own pathway towards the Special Theory of Relativity? hence

Poincaré did contribute to the theory of relativity a great deal. His 1905 space-time theory of groups greatly influenced Minkowski on his way to reformulate and recast mathematically the special theory of relativity. In addition, he arrived at many interesting ideas. However, it appears from examining the primary sources that Poincaré did not influence Einstein on his route to the special theory of relativity. See my papers here