The Formative Years of Relativity. Gravitational waves go in one ear and out the other

The purpose of this piece is to review Hanoch Gutfreund’s and Jürgen Renn’s new book The Formative Years of Relativity: The History and Meaning of Einstein’s Princeton Lectures, Princeton University Press and Oxford University Press. I have found two problems in the book the first of which is Poincaré’s influence on Einstein and the second problem is related to gravitational waves. The first part of the review deals with Poincaré’s influence on Einstein. In this part I discuss the problem related to gravitational waves.

Gravitational waves have won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics. The prize is awarded to Kip Thorne, Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish for their work on Ligo experiment. Actually, Kip Thorne’s interesting work is on wormholes: the Einstein-Rosen bridges, the Schwarzschild (non-traversable) wormholes and traversable wormeholes converted into time machines. Wormholes spark our imagination because of the possibility of travelling backwards in time and sending signals through the throat in space-time with causality violation.

However, let us concentrate on gravitational waves.

I have ordered the book from Amazon together with The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal with People who Treat you Like Dirt written by Robert Sutton, a Stanford University professor:

formative1

It seems that the book, The Formative Years of Relativity has mistakes and also errors in English (the book needs proofreading). I therefore ask the second writer: Are you living in a fool’s paradise?

Right at the beginning Gutfreund argues that gravitational waves is the only major topic debated during the formative years that has no trace in Einstein’s book The Meaning of Relativity. He writes: “Had we restricted our commentaries to the contents of Einstein’s book, there would be no reason to mention gravitational waves; however, it would be inconceivable to talk about the formative years without thoroughly discussing them. What is worth emphasizing in this context is how Einstein’s predominant interest in this phenomenon which developed immediately after the completion of his general theory, had faded away completely by the time he delivered the Princeton lectures” (Gutfreund’s book, page 8):

Picture0

And the above conclusion is mentioned in the New York Times book review section:

Picture00

Gutfreund and Renn “note, however, a conspicuous absence. There is ‘no trace’ in Einstein’s lectures of what is today considered a key topic in relativity: gravitational waves”.

In fact quite the opposite is true. Einstein’s mathematical derivations in his 1916 and 1918 two gravitational waves papers play a central role in The Meaning of Relativity of 1922. It therefore appears that Einstein’s interest in this topic had not faded away by the time he delivered the Princeton lectures.

Consider Einstein’s gravitational waves paper of 1916:

Picture2

And here is the same equation in his 1921 book, The Meaning of Relativity (Gutfreund’s book, page 240):

Picture1

Equation (92) represents the metric of general relativity Picture1 - Copy, which is the sum of the Minkowski flat metric Picture1 - Copy - Copy of special relativity and Picture1 - Copy (2) a very small disturbance.

And again, Einstein’s gravitational waves paper of 1916:

Picture4

And his book, The Meaning of Relativity (Gutfreund’s book, page 246):

Picture3 - Copy

We write the field equations in terms of Picture1 - Copy (2). Equation (96b) below is the linearized approximation of Einstein’s field equations. Then we can solve the field equations in the same way that we solve Maxwell’s electromagnetic field equations (Gutfreund’s book, page 247):

Picture3

Equations (101) above from the book The Meaning of Relativity, which are exactly like equations (9) from the gravitational waves paper of 1916, are the method of retarded potentials.

In his review paper of 1916, The Foundation of the General Theory of Relativity, Einstein’s field equations were valid for systems in unimodular coordinates, i.e. he chose the coordinates so that Picture1111.

However, in his gravitational waves paper of 1916, Einstein thanked de Sitter for sending him the following metric, the one below: “Herr [Willem] de Sitter sent me these values by letter”:

Picture6

And in the book, The Meaning of Relativity he writes the the same metric (Gutfreund’s book, page 249):

Picture5

Indeed, in the book, The Formative Years of Relativity, Gutfreund writes: “On 22 June 1916, Einstein wrote to Willem de Sitter […] ‘For I found that the gravitation equations in first-order approximation [i.e. equations (96b) the linearized approximation of Einstein’s field equations] can be solved exactly by means of retarded potentials, if the condition of Picture1111is abandoned. Your solution for the mass point is then the result upon specialization to this case'” (Gutfreund’s book, page 97):

Picture7

Daniel Kennefick explains Einstein’s letter to de Sitter in his book, Traveling at the Speed of Thought: Einstein and the Quest for Gravitational Waves (page 51):

Picture8

By the way I highly recommend Kennefick’s book.

That being said, in his book The Formative Years of Relativity, Gutfreund once again fails to mention my work. He begins the chapter on gravitational waves with Max Born. Born asked Einstein how fast does the effect of gravitation propagates according to his theory? Einstein replied to him that it is simple to write down the equation for the case where the disturbances one places into the field are infinitesimal. In that case the metric Picture1 - Copy differs only infinitesimally (Picture1 - Copy (2)) from the values (Picture1 - Copy - Copy) that would be present without that disturbance; and the disturbance propagates with the velocity of light (Gutfreund’s book, page 94):

Picture9a

I wrote in my 2015 book General Relativity Conflict and Rivalries and in other places as well that the first time Einstein mentioned gravitational waves was in the discussion after the Vienna lecture in 1913:

Picture12

However, Gutfreund does not cite my 2015 book.

In 2016 Gutfreund wrote a blog post and added Jürgen Renn and Diana Buchwald as co-authors:

Picture10

They told the story of the origin of gravitational waves:

Picture11

They briefly summarize the history of gravitational waves: “The first debates about the existence of gravitational waves even preceded the completion of general relativity by Einstein in November, 1915”. They only mention Max Abraham but don’t write that the first time that Einstein had mentioned gravitational waves was after the Vienna lecture in 1913, in the discussion, Max Born asked Einstein how fast does the effect of gravitation propagates according to his Entwurf theory. Finally they write: “Einstein mentioned gravitational waves for the first time in a letter of 19 February 1916 to Karl Schwarzschild..”. Hence, according to Gutfreund (and Jürgen Renn) in 2016, Einstein did not mention gravitational waves for the first time in the 1913 discussion following the Vienna lecture, he rather did it in 1916. At this stage Gutfreund (and Jürgen Renn) seemed to have been unaware that in 1913 Einstein had discussed gravitational waves with Max Born.

Finally, in the same book, General Relativity Conflict and Rivalries, published in 2015, I write:

Picture14

And I read in Gutfreund’s book of 2017 and discover that he writes exactly the same thing but does not cite my book (Gutfreund’s book, page 35):

Picture13

 

Einstein on Science and Art

prod-einsteinpablo-l[1] Einstein and Picasso 

In 1945 the late Paul M. Laporte, who at the time was teaching art history at Olivert College in Michigan (and later was teaching the history of art at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles) wrote a draft essay which he called: “Cubism and the Theory of Relativity”. In the paper Laporte, being an art historian but not a scientist, tried to link Cubism to popular accounts of the theory of relativity.

Laporte felt he should not publish the essay without getting Einstein’s opinion, and he sent Einstein his essay.

time photo Time Photo

Einstein replied to Laporte on May 4, 1946 a long explanation (in German) on the difference between art and science, and opened his letter by stating in blunt terms: “I find your comparison rather unsatisfactory”. Einstein wrote Laporte that a work of art is “evaluated” differently than a work of science: “In science, the principle of order which creates units is achieved through logical connections while, in art, the principle of order is anchored in the unconscious. The artistic principle of order is always based on traditional modes of connection…”

Einstein often described with lots of creative power the way he invented his scientific theories, and he used artistic language to describe his inventiveness as “free creation of the mind”.

Einstein ended his letter to Laporte by saying that, the essence of the Theory of Relativity has been incorrectly understood in his paper, and he hinted that Cubism has nothing in common with the theory of Relativity:

פיקאסו

“Cubism and Relativity”, Art Journal 25, 1966, 246-248; Leonardo 21, 1988, 313-315.

Laporte’s reaction was: “The thought that Einstein has given to the problem of my paper shows his deep and authentic understanding of art and especially of music. Given the uncontestable fact that I had ‘incorrectly understood’ the essence of the Theory of Relativity, should I have insisted on my notion and published the paper?” He asked: “can a scientific work like Einstein’s Theory be understood only by specialists?” And he answered: “I venture to believe that ‘correct’ understanding, not only in science but also in art, is possible but to a relatively small number of specialists (even while ‘correct’ means something different in the two fields)”.

einstein8HUJI
Laporte thought that Cubism did have something in common with the Theory of Relativity. Was it Einstein’s Theory of Relativity? No it was not. This “theory of relativity” was based on popular accounts of Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. The statement, “It’s All Relative Einstein” was created by popular writers. If “It’s All Relative Einstein”, then Einstein can just take door number one, and Laporte can take door number two… and we get Laporte’s explanation that, correct understanding of relativity means something different in art and science.

Laporte linked Cubism to a popular “theory of relativity” which had nothing in common with Einstein’s beloved science, The Theory of Relativity. Hence, Einstein was right in saying that, “this new artistic ‘language'” (Picasso’s) has nothing in common with The scientific Theory of Relativity.

Laporte wrote that he prepared his essay for publication in the face of Einstein’s objections. The paper was subsequently published in two parts, one under the title “The Space-Time Concept in the Work of Picasso”, and one under the title “Cubism and Science”.

 

 

Einstein’s 135 Birthday: Einstein and the Violin

In his travels, Einstein always took his violin, and was constantly eager for a chance to play. In the early 1920s he went to Prague for a lecture at the university. He liked the city where he had once been a young professor, honing his mathematics and playing chamber music until dawn. Furthermore, Prague had shown hospitality to Mozart, whose “Don Giovanni” premiered there October, 28, 1787. After his lecture, Einstein was expected to speak as guest of honor at a reception. “Instead of making a speech”, he announced, “I’m going to play my violin”, and he did. He performed Mozart and Bach and was enthusiastically applauded by an audience that was grateful perhaps not to have to cope with the relativity theory at a party. x

For more Einstein stories and anecdotes: Roy Meador “The Scientist who Loved to Fiddle”, Toledo Magazine, October, 2-8, 1988. x

m3

במסעותיו איינשטיין נהג לקחת עמו את הכינור והוא תמיד חיפש אחר הזדמנות לנגן. בתחילת שנות ה-1920 הוא נסע להרצות באוניברסיטת פראג. הוא אהב עד מאוד את העיר פראג, שבה היה בצעירותו פרופסור; בעיר זו הוא טיפח את הכושר המתמטי והפיסיקאלי שלו וגם ניגן מוזיקה בחברותא במשך שעות. כמוכן, פראג ארחה את מוצרט, המלחין האהוב על איינשטיין, ובה נערכה ב-28 לאוקטובר 1787 הבכורה של האופרה של מוצרט “דון ג’ובאני”. אחרי הרצאתו של איינשטיין בפראג, ערכו לכבודו קבלת פנים והקהל חיכה שינאם כאורח כבוד. “במקום לנאום”, הוא הכריז, “אני הולך לנגן בכינור”, וכך אכן עשה. הוא ניגן מוצרט ובאך והקהל הנרגש הריע לו בהתלהבות, בהיותו אסיר תודה למדען הדגול על כך ששחרר את קהלו מהתמודדות עם תורת היחסות במסיבה.

George Gamow and Albert Einstein

Here is my new paper about George Gamow and Albert Einstein (here) x

Mr. Newton once said, momentum conservation
Teach einStein acceleration
If it is in empty space,
Moving straight on a trace,
And flies, never to return,
Then nothing remained of it again. x

Albert Einstein

There was a young fellow from Trinity,
Who took the square root of infinity.
But the number of digits, gave him the fidgets;
He dropped Math and took up Divinity. x

George Gamow, One, Two, Three… Infinity

51RopWizffL

Mr. Tomkins was in a world where the speed of light was about 30 km/h

velocidad-maxima

George Gamow and Albert Einstein and the “biggest blunder” x

Einstein’s cosmological constant

The year 2013 is Israel’s “Space Year”. Here

Read my new Paper discussing Einstein’s cosmological model and the cosmological constant:

The Mythical Snake which Swallows its Tail: Einstein’s matter world

In 1917 Einstein introduced into his field equations a cosmological term having the cosmological constant as a coefficient; he invented a finite and spatially closed static universe, bounded in space, according to the idea of inertia having its origin in an interaction between the mass under consideration and all of the other masses in the universe (Mach’s Principle).

In 1931 new experimental findings led Einstein to drop his cosmological constant.

We usually characterize Einstein’s renouncement of the cosmological constant and coming up with new ideas as Einstein’s mistake. Perhaps we rather say that Einstein’s old and new ideas link up with the same good old Mach’s principle that brought him to introduce the cosmological constant.

Later cosmological models of Einstein are either compatible or incompatible with Einstein’s understanding of Mach’s principle.

In 1931 Einstein dropped the cosmological constant and later also dropped Mach’s principle.

ae65

Einstein and Willem de Sitter in 1932

מסיבת התה של הכובען המטורף: הקבוע הקוסמולוגי של איינשטיין

ב-1917 אלברט איינשטיין החליט להוסיף איבר למשוואות השדה של תורת היחסות הכללית שלו. הוא הכניס את האיבר הקוסמולוגי בעל המקדם שקרוי “הקבוע הקוסמולוגי”, כדי שתורת היחסות הכללית תניב יקום סטטי. איינשטיין טען שהאיבר הקוסמולוגי לא ישנה את הקוואריינטיות של משוואות השדה וגם לא את שאר ניבויי התיאוריה.

באותו הזמן תורת היחסות של איינשטיין עדיין לא אומתה ניסויית, אבל איינשטיין היה נחוש בדעתו להשמיט את שאריות המרחב המוחלט שלכאורה אולי נותרו בתורתו. לשם כך הוא המציא “טירה יפיפה שתלוי באוויר”, כפי שאיינשטיין עצמו תאר זאת, עולם סופי וסגור בממדיו המרחביים ובייחוד עולם סטטי. עולם זה תאם לרעיונות של מאך, לפיהם האינרציה מקורה באינטראקציה שבין המסה לשאר המסות ביקום. שנה אחר כך איינשטיין היה כה בטוח ברעיונותיו של מאך עד כי הוא קרא לרעיון זה עקרון מאך.

מבחינה פיזיקאלית, הקבוע הקוסמולוגי בהיותו גדול מאפס פירושו היה הקיום של דחייה קוסמית וכך היקום הסטטי של איינשטיין הוא כזה שבו הדחייה בכל מקום מאזנת את משיכת הכבידה.

והנה ידידו של איינשטיין מלידן, וילהם דה סיטר, הגה פיתרון לאותן משוואות שדה של איינשטיין עם הקבוע הקוסמולוגי, אבל שמניבות יקום ריק לחלוטין. היקום של דה סיטר היה כדורי בממדיו המרחביים, אבל פתוח לאינסוף כאילו היה היפרבולואיד. דה סיטר שמע על עבודתו הניסויית של וסטו סליפר שחקר את המהירויות של 25 ערפיליות ספיראליות (מה שיותר מאוחר כונה גלקסיות). דה סיטר גילה אפקט הסחה לאדום בעולם ההיפרבולואידי שלו.

דה סיטר החליט להשוות בין העולם שלו לעולם של איינשטיין. כדי לעשות זאת הוא ביצע לעולם שלו טרנספורמציה לצורה סטטית, כך שעתה שני העולמות, שלו ושל איינשטיין, היו בעלי עקמומיות חיובית; עולם דה סיטר היה האנלוגיה הארבע-ממדית של העולם התלת-ממדי של איינשטיין. אבל בעולם של דה סיטר הזמן הוא לגמרי יחסי ושווה-ערך במעמדו לשלושת הקואורדינאטות המרחביות ואילו בעולם של איינשטיין הזמן באינסוף היה שונה כאילו היה זה זמן דמוי-מוחלט. לפיכך, המערכת של איינשטיין מספקת את עקרון היחסות רק אם פוסטולט זה תקף לשלושת ממדי המרחב ולא לממד הזמן. מכאן, טען דה-סיטר, איינשטיין השיב במו-ידיו את המרחב המוחלט של ניוטון, אותו חלל מוחלט שהוא כה התאמץ לגרש!

אבל איינשטיין לא השתכנע מהטיעונים של דה סיטר; ולא זאת בלבד, איינשטיין טען שהעולם של דה סיטר מפר את עקרון מאך. איינשטיין ניסה במקום זאת להדגים שהפתרון של דה סיטר מכיל סינגולאריות בדיוק בקו המשווה. במקום הזה שבו מצויה הסינגולאריות מתחבא לו החומר הנעלם ולכן עולם דה סיטר אינו ריק כלל. הטיעון של איינשטיין היה כזה: לפי תורת היחסות הכללית, ככל ששעונים הם קרובים יותר למקור חומרי, כך הם נעים לאט יותר. מכיוון שהשעונים הולכים ומאטים ככל שמתקרבים ל”קו המשווה” בעולם דה סיטר בצורה הסטטית, כל החומר של עולם דה סיטר מרוכז שם בקו המשווה.

ארתור אדינגטון הגדיר זאת בצורה ציורית ב-1920: ביקום דה סיטר “כאשר אנחנו מגיעים למחצית הדרך לנקודה הנגדית, הזמן עומד מלכת. בדיוק כמו מסיבת התה של הכובען המטורף, השעה היא תמיד 6 אחר הצהריים; ושום דבר לא יכול בכלל להתרחש ולא משנה כמה נחכה”.

ולכן איינשטיין הסיק שבפתרון דה סיטר ישנה סינגולאריות אינהרנטית, שהיא חלק מהפיתרון עצמו; ואם כך הדבר, מתחבא לו חומר שם בקו המשווה.

איינשטיין התווכח עם דה סיטר ולא קיבל את עובדת קיום יקומו הריק שסותר את עקרון מאך; ואז נכנס לויכוח המתמטיקאי הדגול פליקס קליין. קליין הסביר לאיינשטיין שקו המשווה בצורה הסטטית של יקום דה סיטר היא תופעת לוואי של הצורה הסטטית. למעשה זו לגמרי מקריות שיקום דה סיטר יכול להיכתב בצורה סטטית. וזו הסיבה שאנחנו אף פעם לא יכולים להגיע לקו המשווה, בגלל שהוא אירוע שנמצא מחוץ להישג ידינו; מערכת הקואורדינאטות שבה העולם של דה סיטר הוא סטטי מכסה רק חלק ממרחב-זמן דה סיטר השלם. לכן הסינגולאריות בקו-המשווה היא סינגולאריות לא אינהרנטית.

איינשטיין בהתחלה התקשה לקבל את הטיעון, אבל בסוף הוא הסכים לקבל שפתרון דה סיטר הוא אכן פתרון למשוואות השדה שלו המתוקנות עם הקבוע הקוסמולוגי, יקום ריק מחומר שמפר את עקרון מאך. אבל הוא עדיין האמין שזהו לא פתרון אפשרי מבחינה פיזיקאלית, אין כזה יקום פיזיקאלי; איינשטיין האמין שכל מודל קוסמולוגי אפשרי צריך להיות סטטי והרי המודל של דה סיטר מבחינה גלובאלית הוא אינו סטטי.

ב-1922 אלכסנדר פרידמן וב-1927 ג’ורג’ למטר פרסמו באופן נפרד זה מזה מודלים דינמיים ליקום. פרידמן גילה מודלים לא-סטטיים מעניינים בעלי קבוע קוסמולוגי שהוא אינו אפס או שווה לאפס. הוא ניבה יקום מתפשט או מתכווץ, שהניב את העולמות של איינשטיין ודה סיטר כמקרה פרטי. המודל של פרידמן עם קבוע קוסמולוגי שווה לאפס היה היקום הפשוט ביותר במסגרת תורת היחסות הפרטית. אבל ב-1922 איינשטיין חשב שהוא מצא טעות בתוצאות של פרידמן, שאם תתוקן, תיתן את היקום הסטטי של איינשטיין. פרידמן שלח לאיינשטיין את החישובים שלו ואיינשטיין השתכנע שהתוצאות של פרידמן אכן נכונות מתמטית, אבל סירב לקבל את הפתרון של פרידמן כמודל פיזיקאלי אפשרי.

ב-1927 למטר פרסם פחות או יותר את אותו המודל כמו זה של פרידמן, כאשר המודל של למטר היה יותר אסטרונומי מאשר המודל המתמטי של פרידמן. אבל כאשר למטר פגש את איינשטיין בכנס סולביי ב-1927, תגובתו של איינשטיין לעבודתו של למטר לא הייתה שונה מתגובתו למודל של פרידמן. איינשטיין היה מוכן לקבל את המתמטיקה אבל לא את הפיזיקה של היקום הדינמי המתפשט.

ב-1929 אדווין האבל הכריז על תגליתו הניסויית לפיה דומה שהיקום למעשה מתפשט. בשנים שאחרי 1930 הנטייה של הקוסמולוגים הייתה לעבור מתמיכה במודלים סטטיים כמתארים את היקום למודלים דינמיים. הגילוי של האבל נחשב לגילוי מרעיש.

ב-1931 איינשטיין ביקר בפסדינה ובהר וילסון והאבל וד”ר אדמס ליוו אותו למצפה כדי שיצפה בשמיים באמצעות הטלסקופ. איינשטיין הביט בגרמי השמיים והתפעם ולא רצה לעזוב את המקום. הוא בחן את התצפיות של האבל ועדויות אחרות שאיששו שאכן היקום מתפשט. איינשטיין שמע מהאבל עצמו אודות התצפיות שלו שהובילו למסקנה שהיקום מתפשט.

בשובו לברלין איינשטיין החליט לנטוש את הקבוע הקוסמולוגי לטובת יקום פרידמן עם הקבוע הקוסמולוגי ששווה לאפס. איינשטיין שב למשוואות השדה שלו מ-1916 ללא הקבוע הקוסמולוגי. איינשטיין פרסם מאמר קצר ב-1931 בו הוא מציג מודל קוסמולוגי עם קבוע קסמולוגי ששווה לאפס. מיד אחר כך דה סיטר הציג מודל קוסמולוגי זהה וב-1932 איינשטיין ודה סיטר חברו יחד וכתבו מאמר משותף שבו הם הציגו את מודל איינשטיין-דה סיטר.

למטר נותר נאמן לקבוע הקוסמולוגי והציע ב-1933 את ההיסטוריה המודרנית הראשונה של העולם. אבל בגלל השפעתו העצומה של איינשטיין שויתר על הקבוע הקוסמולוגי, קוסמולוגים לא שמו לב בהתחלה לרעיונות של למטר.

למטר הניח שהקבוע הקוסמולוגי גדול מאפס. הוא גילה שעבור יקום הומוגני איזוטרופי מתפשט, בזמן אפס בהיסטוריה הייתה סינגולאריות (והרי אנחנו זוכרים שלאיינשטיין הייתה בעיה עם סינגולאריות). בעקבות הסינגולאריות הזו הייתה התפשטות. כאשר בוחרים את הערך של הקבוע הקוסמולוגי בצורה מתאימה, מתחילה התפשטות מואצת, תחת דחייה קוסמית שאחר כך מואטת על ידי כבידה-עצמית מגיעים לכמעט עצירה במצב של יקום איינשטיין סטטי, שהוא בלתי תלוי בזמן. לפי למטר היקום המוקדם מאוד היה אטום קדום, גרעין אטומי קוסמי, כאשר הוא התפרק רדיואקטיבית בצורה ספונטאנית בצורת המפץ הגדול. ולכן היקום המאוד קדום נשלט על ידי חלקיקים בעלי אנרגיה מאוד גבוהה שיצרו יקום קדום הומוגני. למטר הסיק את קיומן של הקרניים הקוסמיות, השריד הקדום ביותר מההתפרקות הזו, חלקיקים אנרגטיים המרכיבים קרינת רקע למודל.

סטודנט של למטר סיפר, שמרבית האסטרונומים בתקופתו חשדו בתורת המפץ הגדול של למטר ובייחוד איינשטיין חשד בה, כי מי שהציע אותה היה כומר קתולי ותמך בה קווייקר [זרם דתי נוצרי] אדוק (ארתור אדינגטון).

אחרי שהוא ויתר על הקבוע הקוסמולוגי, איינשטיין המבוגר גם ויתר על עקרון מאך; וכך הוא נותר בלי קבוע קוסמולוגי, בלי עקמומיות מרחבית ובלי עקרון מאך… ג

Albert Einstein and Hermann Minkowski’s Space-time Formalism

Vesselin Petkov writes: “Minkowski’s contributions to modern physics have not been fully and appropriately appreciated. […] Einstein called Minkowski’s approach ‘superfluous learnedness’. Also, Sommerfeld’s recollection of what Einstein said on one occasion can provide further indication of his initial attitude towards Minkowski’s development of the implications of the equivalence of the times of observers in relative motion: ‘Since the mathematicians have invaded the relativity theory, I do not understand it myself any more’. […] Despite his initial negative reaction towards Minkowski’s four-dimensional physics Einstein relatively quickly realized that his revolutionary theory of gravity would be impossible without the revolutionary contributions of Minkowski”. x

First let us correct a myth here: it is not quit true that Minkowski’s contributions have not been appreciated. Hermann Minkowski was Einstein’s former mathematics professor at the Zürich Polytechnic. During his studies at the Polytechnic Einstein skipped Minkowski’s classes; but Einstein also skipped Prof. Carl Friedrich Geiser’s lectures as much as he skipped Prof. Adolf Hurwitz’s classes… They were all mathematicians. Einstein never showed up the classes of mathematicians. At that time Einstein was less interested in mathematics than in the visible process of physics. He found it difficult to accept for a long time the importance of abstract mathematics, and found high mathematics necessary only when developing his gravitation theory – he discovered the qualities of high mathematics around 1912

Einstein and his wife around 1905

Second, On September 21, 1908, in the 80th annual general meeting of the German Society of Scientists and Physicians at Cologne, Minkowski presented his famous talk, “Space and Time”. x

Minkowski

May years later his assistant, the physicist Max Born wrote: “I went to Cologne, met Minkowski and heard his celebrated lecture ‘Space and Time’, delivered on 21 September 1908. […] He told me later that it came to him as a great shock when Einstein published his paper in which the equivalence of the different local times of observers moving relative to each other was pronounced; for he had reached the same conclusions independently but did not publish them because he wished first to work out the mathematical structure in all its splendor. He never made a priority claim and always gave Einstein his full share in the great discovery”. x

Scott Walter writes, “This story of Minkowski’s recollection of his encounter with Einstein’s paper on relativity is curious, in that the idea of the observable equivalence of clocks in uniform motion had been broached by Poincaré in one of the papers studied during the first session of the electron-theory seminar. It is possible, of course, that Poincaré’s operational definition of local time escaped Minkowski’s attention, or that Minkowski was thinking of an exact equivalence of timekeepers”. [In the
summer of 1905, Minkowski and David Hilbert led an advanced seminar on electrodynamical theory]. x

Before 1905 Poincaré stressed the importance of the method of clocks and their synchronization by light signals. He gave a physical interpretation of Lorentz’s local time in terms of clock synchronization by light signals, and formulated a principle of relativity. However, Poincaré did not pronounce “the equivalence of the different local times of observers moving relative to each other”. Einstein was the first to do so

Poincaré

 John Stachel explains Poincaré’s clock synchronization: “Poincaré had interpreted the local time as that given by clocks at rest in a frame moving through the ether when synchronized as if – contrary to the basic assumptions of Newtonian kinematics – the speed of light were the same in all inertial frames. Einstein dropped the ether and the ‘as if’: one simply synchronized clocks by the Poincaré convention in each inertial frame and accepted that the speed of light really is the same in all inertial frames when measured with clocks so synchronized”. x

Einstein in the Patent Office

In the text of the lecture of the Cologne talk immediately after presenting Lorentz’s local time it is written: “However, the credit of first recognizing sharply that the time of the one electron is just as good as that of the other, i.e., that t and t’ are to be treated the same, is of A. Einstein”. And Minkowski referred to Einstein’s 1905 relativity paper and to his 1907 review article

Read my short paper (a note) on Einstein, Minkowski and Max Born’s recollections of Minkowski’s work

Einstein’s pathway to his General Theory of Relativity

Einstein thought that when dealing with gravity high velocities are not so important. So in 1912 he thought about gravity in terms of the principle of relativity and not in terms of the constant-speed-of-light postulate (special relativity). But then he engaged in a dispute with other scholars who claimed that he gave up the central postulate of his special theory of relativity. x

File:Max abraham.png

Max Abraham

File:Gunnar Nordström.jpg

Gunnar Nordström

Einstein’s Pathway to his Equivalence Principle 1905-1907

paper

1912 – 1913 Static Gravitational Field Theory

paper

1913 – 1914 “Entwurf” theory

paper

Berlin “Entwurf” theory 1914

paper

The Einstein-Nordström Theory

paper

Dawn of “Entwarf theory”

paper

1915 Relativity Theory

paper

1916 General Theory of Relativity

paper